Category Archives: Music for commercials

Here’s How Music Licensing Works

Curious on how music licensing really works? There’s a great primer on just that over at How Stuff Works:
 

This ad campaign is using the Beatles song as the theme music. It is also using the voice of the lead singer of the band named Gomez laid on top of the Beatles original. The speculation is that Philips paid $1 million to use the song, and that Philips paid the band Gomez $100,000.
 
This is the world of music licensing — a world where the rights to use music are bought and sold every day. This world is most obvious to us in a case like the one described in this example. A popular song that everyone knows gets embedded in a TV commercial or a popular movie.
 
It turns out, however, that music licensing is something that happens constantly, all around us. When you listen to music on the radio, that music is licensed. When you hear music in a restaurant, that music is licensed too. In this article, you will have the chance to learn about all the different forms that music licensing can take.

 
Read the full primer on music licensing here.
 
And if it all seems too baffling, remember that royalty-free music makes things a lot less complicated on that front. So if licensing is causing you headaches, have a peek around this site to find some readily-available music.


Posted by Asbjoern on January 22, 2014 - Contact



Category Music for commercials,Royalty-free ad music Tags , ,
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10 Brands That Innovate With Music

Over at AdvertisingAge, Ann-Christine Diaz takes an interesting look at what some brands are doing when it comes to music and branding:
 

Licensing popular songs for ads is so passé. Here are the advertisers who have a track record of going a step further with music — and demonstrating for consumers that making tunes is a meaningful part of their marketing DNA:

 
Read the full feature on music as branding here.


Posted by Asbjoern on October 17, 2013 - Contact



Category Music for commercials,Sound branding Tags ,
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Fresh music for advertising

If you need a track with a modern, contemporary electro sound, Monodumb’s track below it’s definitely worth checking out. Get the full version by clicking the black BUY link.




Posted by Asbjoern on April 12, 2013 - Contact



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Powerful promo music: Get it right here!

If you need energetic music for your commercial, promo or presentation trailer, be sure to check out my new track below. It’s called Total Trailblazer and works really well with high-intensity content. You can grab the HQ, non-watermarked version here.
 

 
Click here to instantly license and download the track.


Posted by Asbjoern on March 11, 2013 - Contact



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Why reference music is so vital to getting you the right sound

 

I compose for a living, so my days are chuck-full of music. But I’ve always enjoyed a good challenge, so in my spare time, I take part in music competitions from time to time. They can be a great way of trying out new genres and doing stuff for the fun of it. And of course, winning is never a bad thing either!

 

But one recent competition really hammered home why references are critical in getting the sound you’re after.

 

In the design brief for the competition, the client outlined what they wanted and gave the following keywords for what the project – and thus, the music – was going to be like:

 

“Stylish, laid-back, cool, beautiful, funny, seductive, chill, modern, gripping, possibly a little provocative, adventurous, brave, trendy and spellbinding.”

 

That’s quite a handful!

 

There were more than 600 entries in the competition, with many composers struggling to meet the client’s requirements.

 

And the end result: Around 500 out of the 600 entries were deemed not to fit the brief.

 

That’s a lot of composing going to waste, and ultimately, it can be frustrating for both composers and the client: The composers end up doing tracks that are going nowhere, and the client has to spend countless hours listening to irrelevant music.

 

Not optimal for anyone, to say the least.

 

But what is the problem with giving keywords for the kind of music you’re after?

 

Well, there are two issues here:

 

1. Your Stylish Is Not My Stylish

There’s a saying that talking about music is like dancing about architecture, and there’s definitely a truth to that.

 

Music is an abstract concept, and your idea of, say, stylish may differ wildly from my idea of what’s stylish. Your definition of what’s stylish or what’s.. well, anything! – is the result of your past experiences, your personal preferences, your cultural influences, and so much more.

 

That’s not to say that there aren’t tracks out there that most would describe as ’stylish’ – it’s just not that clear-cut.

 

And if you’re not used to talking about music, it gets even harder to capture a certain feel in words.

 

 

2. Less Really IS More

If keywords were unclear enough to begin with, once you start adding and combining more keywords, it gets even more complicated.

 

Imagine if I asked you to find a great, stylish, modern, trendy, yet funny jazz track. I would then go do the same.

 

What do you think the chances of us picking the same track would be? I guess it could happen that we miraculously found the same one, but the odds are certainly against it. We may even find tracks that are markedly different in style.

 

That’s essentially what’s happening when you’re asking a composer to create a track for you, based on keywords alone. Chances that you and the composer are on the same page are slim, especially if you haven’t worked together before.

 

That’s not to say that keywords are completely useless. They can be a good guideline for what you’re after, as long as you keep them at a reasonable level and you really think about them before you jot them down.

 

Also: Do they make sense as a whole? Ie. does ‘stylish, cool, funny, adventurous’ even make sense? It might, given the context – but do give it some thought.

 

 

So if keywords are such a tricky tool for finding the music you’re after, how DO you go about it then? Here’s what I’d suggest:

 

1. Talk to your composer

Say you’re launching a new project and you want to some music that blows the socks off your target audience.

 

The music should be modern, cool and, well, a bit edgy. Start out by talking to your composer, outline what you’re after and ask him or her to find some music examples of this. And, importantly, you should do the same.

 

Perhaps you’ve heard a track in an ad that really had a cool, modern sound to it. Or you went to an event where they had this really great music playing. Or maybe your competitor is doing something with music that just blows you away. Maybe you’ve even heard a royalty-free music track that fits the bill, but you want something original and custom for your project.
 
Gather as many examples as you can, and narrow them down to just one, or two or three tracks.

 

And, as mentioned, keywords are not necessarily to be avoided at all costs. Just find a few, fitting ones, and don’t let them be your only reference.

 

Then present your selected examples (perhaps just one, but no more than two or three) and a few keywords to the composer – and listen to the composer’s suggestions as well.

 
 

2. Keep an open mind

Just as making that product you’re launching is a specialist skill, so is finding the right music. So keep an open mind to what the composer is presenting to you.

 

If you’re finding it tricky to find some good examples of what you want, don’t despair. Ask your composer for examples instead and use these for narrowing down what you’re after.

 
 

3. Try it out

One way of determining what’s right for your project is simply playing the track along with your visuals, if you have any. It may turn out that the track you – or the composer – really thought would be amazing for your project just doesn’t work when used with the visuals.

 

If so, it’s time to scrap it – and celebrate! Why? Because you’ve just excluded a track without wasting valuable time and money having the composer create something that just wouldn’t work.

 
 

4. Don’t go for sound-alikes

The biggest danger with using examples is that you end up falling in love with your example tracks. This is called temp love, and is indeed a sneaky thing. And if you fall under the spell of temp love, nothing but your example track is really going to cut it.

 

How do you avoid that? Think of the example tracks as just that: Examples. They demonstrate the direction you want the music to go in, but let the composer work from that and do his or her own interpretation and take.

 

Also try to avoid using the temp tracks too much during the creative or editing process. If you’re sure the example track fits (by trying it out as described in step 3), ask the composer to do a somewhat similar-sounding draft track for you to use during this phase instead.

 

Of course, sometimes you DO want a sound-alike. Just make sure you clearly communicate to the composer what you’re looking for and how the examples should be used.

 

 

 

In the competition example from the beginning of this post, I don’t blame the client for the guidance (or lack of proper guidance) at all. Giving directions on a project where you’re not really sure what you want IS tricky.

 

I think the issue with the specific competition was that the contest site did not help the client find REFERENCES that gave an idea of what the client wanted.
 

And it quite clearly shows that if the design brief is not properly put together and thought through before even a single note is composed, things could get time-consuming, expensive and perhaps even frustrating for both clients and composers.

 

 

But if you follow the steps above, you’ll stand a much greater chance of getting music for your project that’s spot-on, on time and – hopefully – will leave your target audience cheering.

 

Good luck with your project! And if you need help finding or having the right music created for your project, do get in touch.


Posted by Asbjoern on October 4, 2012 - Contact



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Fresh, upbeat music for adverts

I’ve just come across BlueFoxMusic, a great new royalty-free music composer who’s releasing some brilliant contemporary and fresh-sounding tracks that go really well with advertising projects. I particularly like ‘Midnight In Tokyo’.
 
Get his best tracks in a pack (27+ minutes of music!) at a 50% discount by clicking the BUY link in the player – or find the individual tracks in the list below the player at the regular price.
 




 

Tracklisting :

 

1. Blue Groove Deluxe – 2:41

 

2. Power Up – 2:00

 

3. Midnight In Tokyo – 2:51

 

4. The Secrets Of Success – 3:18

 

5. Chase The Stars – 4:32

 

6. Victorious – 3:39

 

7. Forever Summer Afternoons – 2:21


Posted by Asbjoern on September 5, 2012 - Contact



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Five Common Mistakes When Using Music In Videos, And How To Avoid Them

This is an article I wrote for ezinearticles.com – you’re free to use it in your own ezine or on your blog, as long as you include the footer and the link to the original article. Hope you enjoy it!
 
Music is a cornerstone in most videos, but you’ll want to do it right. Otherwise you run the risk that the video you’ve spent so much time putting together gets taken down, comes across as amateurish or interferes with your visuals.
 
Here are five common mistakes when selecting music for your video – and how to avoid them:
 
1. Using music without a proper license
 
Music is everywhere, so it’s tempting to pick a great-sounding track from your music collection and just use it in your video. But don’t! If you don’t have the proper license in place to use the track, it could end you in hot water. The copyright holders will likely have your video taken down, and may even go after you for illegal use of their music – not to mention the fact that composers, like everyone else, really like to be compensated for their work.
 
Remember, once you release your video, it might get spread around – even more than you expected or planned – and if that happens, you really don’t want an unlicensed track to be in the video.
 
How to license music for your video: If you have the budget, bring in a composer to do custom music for your project. If not, visit a stock music site and find a track that fits. It’s quite affordable to license a track, and once your video goes viral, you can use your time celebrating instead of spending sleepless nights worrying about that unlicensed track you used.
 
2. Including a track just because it’s your favorite
 
Don’t just include a track because it happens to be one of your favorites. Think about how it works within the context of your video, and if it works with your intended audience. Your choice of music can greatly affect how your video is perceived, so think it through before you just reach for that favorite track of yours.
 
How to find the right music: Many stock music sites allow you to download previews of the tracks you can license, and this can be a great way of trying out different tracks and genres before making your final decision. Use the previews in your early versions of your video to give you an idea of what works – and ask friends, colleagues or others who have useful input to chime in. If you get great feedback on a given track, it’s time to grab a license, put in the full version and release your video.
 
3. Messing up the mix
 
If you haven’t thought about the mix balance in your video, you could end up ruining your audio and ultimately, the overall impression of the video.
 
How to balance your mix: Whenever there’s dialogue or narration, keep the music low enough so that the voices can be clearly heard. If you’re using sound effects, be sure to balance things so the music and effects are not competing for the same space in your sound. If there are parts of your video without sound effects or voice-over, you can take the music up a notch. Be sure to compare your mix to other videos to hear if you’ve got the balance right.
 
4. Breaking the flow
 
If you don’t edit your music properly, it can severely break the flow of your video. Trying to combine two tracks without careful editing, not thinking about the music transitions or using too many tracks in a short period of time or is a surefire way of annoying your viewers.
 
How to create a great flow in your video: Edit your music so it follows the on-screen events, don’t cut a track abruptly, and create subtle transitions. Think of the rhythm in the music, and let this guide your editing. Doing so will make the music and visuals blend together much better.
 
And don’t be afraid to have passages without any music at all – it allows some breathing room and generates a far better impact when you cue that next track.
 
5. Distracting the viewer
 
Music with vocals or strong melodic content demand a lot of attention, and if you overuse tracks with this kind of content, it can severely detach from your visuals or the story or message you’re telling in your video.
 
How to keep your viewer focused: Go for instrumental tracks whenever you want your visuals or story to take center stage, and use melodic content sparingly. If you have sequences with montage-like content, this is an area where you can bring in the more melodic stuff, or vocal tracks, to great effect – if it fits with your overall presentation.
 
I’m a composer and music supervisor myself, and I hope this has given you some ideas on how to make music a strong part of your videos, and what to avoid.
 
Good luck with your video project!
 

—-

If you need music for your video, do stop by my site – Music For Ads – where I’ve sorted through myriads of royalty-free tracks to bring you the very best music for videos.

I also create custom music for authors, creatives, experts and corporate clients who want to use their own distinctive sound as part of their brand to differentiate themselves in the marketplace. Reach me at the link above.
 

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Asbjoern_Andersen
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7166016


Posted by Asbjoern on September 3, 2012 - Contact



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Music for advertising: Composer highlight

Finnish composing group Organique has done some really great tracks, with a live, organic feel and excellent compositions.
 
Their production values are among the best I’ve heard in royalty-free music, and I suggest you check them out if you’re looking for well-composed, great-sounding music for your advertising project.
 
Hear their portfolio below, and click the black buy button to get the active track.
 



Posted by Asbjoern on August 29, 2012 - Contact



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Three clever ways of saving money on royalty-free music

Royalty-free music is the best way of getting affordable music for your advertising project, short of having someone create the music for you for free – but there are ways to get an even better deal. These ideas are for Audiojungle, but you’ll probably find them useful on other sites as well.

 

1. Pre-pay

Many royalty-free music sites allow you to deposit money to your account on the site, rather than buying each item with your credit card. And if you plan on buying more than one track, depositing is the way to go. Why? Because if you pay by credit card on a per-track basis, you’re charged an additional $2 dollars per track for the credit handling. So by buying using your pre-paid deposit, you’re essentially saving each time you’re buying a track.

 

2. Buy the packs

Many composers bundle their tracks in packs, allowing you to save 50% per track. If you find great tracks from a composer, check if he or she is making their music available in packs as well. If so, you can get several tracks in one go, and save while doing so. You can also find the most popular music packs here.

 

3. Buy direct from the composers

Found a composer whose music would work well with your advertising project? Have a look at their profile and look at the row of icons in the top-right corner. These are badges given for various achievements on the site, being a member for a certain number of years etc. But what you want to look for is an icon with a checkmark. If you hover your cursor on this icon, it’ll say ‘Exclusive Author’.

 

If this icon is NOT present, you’ll have a good chance of striking a very good deal with that composer. Because the absence of the icon means that the composer has not made an exclusive deal with the stock music site, meaning that he or she can sell their tracks wherever they like.

 

Find out what tracks you’d like to buy from the composer, and get in touch with him or her, asking if you can buy the tracks directly.

 

Since composers give a large cut of their profits to the stock music sites (50%-75%, depending on whether they’re selling on an exclusive basis or not), the composer should be able to give you a good discount selling directly to you, while still making more than selling via the stock music site. And the more tracks you’re interested in buying, the higher the chance that the composer is willing to make you a great offer.

 

 

Have you found other ways of saving money when buying royalty-free music? Do share your ideas and tips in the comments below!

 

- Asbjoern


Posted by Asbjoern on July 16, 2012 - Contact



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Positive advertising music: A Sunny Day

Audiojungle composers Soundroll and Yuar just released a new track that could help you bring a little sunshine to your productions.
 
Featuring vocals and a positive vibe, A Sunny Day is worth checking out if you’re looking for warm, optimistic music for your ad project or presentation.
 
Check it out below, and click the black BUY button on the player to license it for your production:
 

 
Want to read the lyrics? Find them here.


Posted by Asbjoern on July 6, 2012 - Contact



Category Music for commercials Tags , , , , , , ,
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